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PEI Statistics

For National and Regional statistics on family violence please click here.

Family Violence and Intimate Partner Violence         

According to the PEI Victims of Family Violence Act a “family relationship” means a relationship between any two people who are or have been married to each other, or who have lived together in a spousal or sexual relationship, or are members of the same family. 
(Source: Victims of Family Violence Act) 

According to the Act “family violence” is violence against that person by any other person with whom that person is, or has been, in a family relationship.  Violence includes any assault of the victim; any reckless act or omission that causes injury to the victim or damage to property; any act or threat that causes a reasonable fear of injury to the victim or damage to property; forced confinement of the victim; actions or threats of sexual abuse, physical abuse or emotional  abuse of the victim; and depriving a victim of food, clothing, medical attention, shelter, transportation or other necessities of life.
(Source: Victims of Family Violence Act)

Download Prince Edward Island Statistics (2017)

[PDF file]

  • Province-wide in 2016 there were 199 victims of police-reported family violence substantiated by police to be victims of Criminal Code offenses. In 2015 there were 224 and in 2014 there were 233.  In 2016 Prince Edward Island had the lowest rate of police-reported family violence in Canada and the lowest rates of police-reported family violence involving physical and sexual assault. (Source: Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile, 2015 – pub. Feb 2017, 2016 - pub. Jan 2018)

  • In 2017 the Prince Edward Island RCMP L Division received 296 reports of family violence; 49% of reports (146) resulted in charges being laid.
 
  • In 2017, Charlottetown Police Services received 121 reports of family violence; 24% (29) resulted in charges being laid.

  • In 2017, the Summerside Police Department received 49 reports of assaults that met domestic violence criteria; 49% (24) resulted in criminal charges. They also received 11 reports of mischief that met domestic violence criteria; 54% (6) resulted in criminal charges.

  • In 2017 the Summerside Police Department received 17 reports of uttering threats that met domestic violence criteria, of which 47% (8) resulted in criminal charges.  In the two year period 2015-2016 they received 16 reports of uttering threats that met domestic violence criteria, of which 50% (8) resulted in criminal charges.  (Note: due to small numbers, statistics for a two year period are reported.)  (Source:  Summerside Police Department)

  • In the five year period, January 1, 2013-December 31, 2017 the Kensington Police Department investigated 26 reports of assaults associated with family violence. Of these 23% (6) resulted in charges being laid. (Source: Kensington Police Department)

  • Between April 1, 2016 and March 31, 2017, a total of 902 cases were referred to Victim Services. Of these, 29% involved crimes where there was a family type relationship between the victim and suspect or offender. Crimes can include but are not limited to assault, sexual assault, damage to property, driving-related offences, theft and fraud. In 275 of the total cases referred to Victim Services, the suspect or offender was a male partner or ex-partner (either current or former husband, common-law husband, or boyfriend). In 31 cases, the suspect or offender was a female partner or ex-partner. Trends over time are similar year to year. (Source: Annual Report – Victims of Crime Act 2016-2017)

  • Between April 1, 2016 and March 31, 2017, 77 applications for Emergency Protection Orders were granted to victims of family violence. Emergency protection orders are provisions under the Victims of Family Violence Act that can provide safety measures for a victim and her/his children, often enabling victims and children to remain in the home. Historically, the number of applications has varied somewhat from year to year. (Source: Annual Report – Victims of Crime Act 2016-2017)

  • PEI Family Violence Prevention Services outreach workers provide assistance to women who are victims of family violence living in the community. Between April 1, 2016 and March 31, 2017 outreach workers provided services to 291 women; 49% of these women sought outreach services for the first time. Historically, women receiving services receive an average of 9.5 supportive contacts per year.

  • Anderson House, managed by PEI Family Violence Prevention Services, is the primary emergency shelter on Prince Edward Island for abused women and their children. Between April 1, 2016 and March 31, 2017 Anderson House admitted 73 women and 22 children; 55% of women received emergency shelter at Anderson House for the first time.
 
Spousal and Intimate Partner Violence


  • According to the 2014 General Social Survey, the proportion of survey respondents who reported experiencing spousal violence in the five years prior to the survey was 4% across the Canadian provinces, down from 7% in 2004.  While based on small numbers that are to be used with caution, the proportion of Islanders surveyed who reported experiencing spousal violence in 2014 is lower than the proportion who reported experiencing spousal violence in 2009 but is similar to the proportion who reported spousal violence in 2004, about 5%. (Source: Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile, 2014 - pub. Jan 2016 )

  • Province-wide in 2016 there were 298 victims of police-reported intimate partner violence substantiated by police to be victims of Criminal Code offenses. In 2015 there were 240 and in 2014 there were 253.  Intimate partner violence is violence committed by legally married, separated, divorced, opposite and same-sex common-law, dating partners (current and previous) and other intimate partners. In 2016 Prince Edward Island had the second lowest rate of police-reported intimate partner violence in Canada. (Source: Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile, 2014 - pub. Jan 2016, 2015 – pub. Feb 2017, 2016- pub. Jan 2018)

Sexual Violence

  • Province-wide in 2016 there were 70 incidents of police-reported sexual assault (levels 1, 2 and 3) substantiated by police to be Criminal Code offences. In 2015 there were 73, in 2014 there were 56 and in 2013 there were 85. As noted in the section on national statistics, the number of sexual assaults reported to police is likely an undercount of the actual number of sexual assaults that occur. According to the General Social Survey, only 5% of sexual assaults were brought to the attention of police in 2014. (Source: Police-reported crime statistics in Canada, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016; Criminal Victimization in Canada, 2014)

  • Between April 1, 2016 and March 31, 2017 85 cases were referred to Victim Services for sexual assault matters; 87% of cases were female and 13% were male. Forty four percent of cases involved persons 12-17 years of age. The number of referrals varies from year to year. Between 2009-2010 and 2015-2016, referrals to Victim Services for sexual assault matters ranged from a low of 51 to a high of 93. (Source: Prince Edward Island Victim Services)

  • Between April 1, 2016 and March 31, 2017 the PEI Rape and Sexual Assault Centre received 112 new requests for service: 61% of requests for service were from adults who are survivors of childhood sexual abuse and 16% were from survivors of sexual assaults that occurred within the previous six months. A total of 118 clients received services during the fiscal year.
 

Adult Protection


The PEI Adult Protection Program provides assistance or protection intervention to vulnerable adults who are unable to protect themselves from abuse and neglect.  The PEI statistics provided here pertain to vulnerable adults and, therefore, cannot be compared to national statistics on violence against seniors.

  • Between January 1 and December 31, 2016 Prince Edward Island Adult Protection Services investigated 301 cases; 53% for self neglect, 14% for caregiver neglect, 16% for financial abuse, 11% for verbal/emotional abuse, 4% for physical abuse, and 2% for sexual abuse. 55% of investigations involved female victims. 73% of the cases involved adults age 65 years and older and 16% of cases involved adults 85 years or older. The vast majority of perpetrators were known and trusted. 58% of perpetrators were family, 18% were friends and paid caregivers, and 13% were staff in hospitals, group homes and public and private care facilities. Since 2012 the number of investigations for allegations of abuse and neglect of vulnerable adults has increased by 126%. Mandatory reporting for all persons working with vulnerable adults was implemented in February 2014. In addition, the Island population is aging.  These factors may account for some of the increase in referrals over time. (Source: Prince Edward Island Adult Protection)

  • Province-wide in 2016 there were 10 senior victims of police-reported family violence substantiated by police to be victims of Criminal Code offenses. In 2015 there were 9 and in 2014 there were 12. In 2016 and 2015 Prince Edward Island had the lowest rate of police-reported family violence against seniors in Canada. (Source: Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile, 2014 - pub. Jan 2016, 2015 – pub. Feb 2017, 2016- pub. Jan 2018)

Violence Against Children and Youth


  • Province-wide in 2016 there were 48 children and youth age 0-17 years who were victims of police-reported family violence substantiated by police to be Criminal Code offences.  In 2015 there were 56 and in 2014 there were 60. Family violence refers to violence committed by parents, siblings, extended family and spouses. The Criminal Code and provincial/territorial child protection legislation together cover a broad spectrum of maltreatment and violence perpetrated against children and youth. Some types of child maltreatment may never reach the criminal threshold and would therefore not result in a police response or Criminal Code charges. However, in many cases, these occurrences would still be considered serious events requiring the involvement of provincial/territorial child welfare services. (Source: Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile, 2014 - pub. Jan 2016, 2015 – pub. Feb 2017, 2016- pub. Jan 2018)

  • Between April 1, 2016 and March 31, 2017 Prince Edward Island Child Protection Services received 3,449 Child Protection Reports or an average of 66 reports per week, more than an average of 9 reports per day. During this time period 2,028 investigations were opened, 696 children received child protection services in their own homes, 193 children were in care, focused intervention services were provided to 608 parents, and 13 youth received extended care services.
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