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Microphone Project


The Microphone Project provides a resource to help teachers, parents and community group leaders start a conversation with students on topics including consent, healthy relationships, communication and support.
This resource supports Grade 9 Health Curriculum and other outcomes specific to sexual health.

Background


PEI singer/songwriter Kinley Dowling wrote the song Microphone to tell the story of how she was sexually assaulted after her high school prom 15 years ago.


The Youth Engagement Working Group of the Premier's Action Committee on Family Violence Prevention provided the vision of using the song and video as a classroom resource on Prince Edward Island. With the support of Kinley, video director Jenna MacMillan, and the task team, the Microphone Project was born.

The Microphone Project consists of four 45-60 minute lessons, each with its own theme:


Module 1: Consent
Teaches students to identify other areas in their lives where consent is needed, to identify and practice scripts for asking, answering and negotiating consent, and to accept the need to ask for and obtain consent in sexual relationships.

Module 2: Gender Stereotypes
Teaches students how to identify how gender norms and stereotypes contribute to sexual violence, to understand how traditional gender norms and stereotypes can be toxic for everyone regardless of sex traits and/or gender identity, and to identify strategies for resisting or challenging harmful gender norms and stereotypes.

Module 3: Sexual Assault
Teaches students how to identify Prince Edward Island supports that can help if you have been sexually assaulted, how to identify ways to respond to sexual assault, and to think about the ramifications of sexual assault.

Module 4: Bystander Role
Teaches students about understanding how taking action as a bystander can help prevent violence, to identify ways to safely intervene as a bystander, and how to recognize their responsibility as a bystander.
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